California Anti-Harassment Training

Senate Bill 778 Extends Employee Anti-Harassment Training Deadline

Author, Alyssa Burley, Media Communications and Client Services Manager, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

Newly passed Senate Bill 778 (SB 778) extends the deadline set in Senate Bill 1343 for California’s mandatory Anti-Harassment Training from January 1, 2020 to January 1, 2021. The bill also addresses concerns about supervisory employees and clarifies when temporary workers must be trained. California Governor Newsom signed the bill into law on August 30, 2019, which included an urgency clause that allows the bill to go into effect immediately.

Providing Anti-Harassment Training Is the Employer’s Responsibility

Author, Alyssa Burely, Media Communications and Client Services Manager, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

Many industries like construction utilize a semi-transient workforce that can shift from company to company as labor needs change throughout the project’s life cycle. Employees may work a few months for one employer, then move on to another employer when the project is completed. This scenario poses a dilemma for California employers looking to comply with Senate Bill 1343 (SB 1343). Providing training to an ever-changing workforce can be a challenge.

Employers Prepare As Reports of Sexual Harassment Spike

Author, Alyssa Burley, Media Communications and Client Services Manager, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

Americans are all too familiar with the #MeToo movement that has shed light on sexual harassment in the workplace. Outspoken celebrities and prominent public figures have brought this topic to the forefront in the media. With all the publicity surrounding sexual harassment allegations, people are empowered to speak out and report unwanted behaviors in the workplace. This leaves many employers asking what they can do to prevent harassment and prepare for possible harassment allegations.

Protecting Employees from Third Party Harassment

Author, Chase Hixson, Account Executive, Human Services Group, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

The recent changes to California’s Anti-Harassment Training Requirements have prompted employers to take a closer look at their internal operations and how they can eliminate harassment from the workplace. A question that is frequently asked is “What happens if the harassment comes from someone other than one of my employees?” This is known as Third Party Harassment.