Surety

Maximize Your Bond Line of Credit by Collecting Account Receivables

Author, Matt Gaynor, Director of Surety, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

We often hear the term “cash is king” in the construction business. When referring to our contractor clients’ bond line of credit, this term is paramount. The various sources of cash listed on a balance sheet (i.e., cash in the bank, accounts receivable, available bank lines of credit) will largely influence the bond company’s calculation of the bond credit line. Let’s focus on accounts receivable.

Surety Bonds: What Are They, What Do They Do, and Why Am I Required to Get Them?

Author, Andy Roberts, Account Executive, Surety Division, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

When we have clients that are required to bond for the first time, often their first questions are what is a surety bond, how do they work, and why am I being required to provide one.  

In its basic form, a surety bond is a three party agreement between the contractor, called the principal, the project owner, called the obligee, and the surety company. The surety company provides a financial guarantee to the obligee that the principal is both qualified and capable of performing the contracted job.

What is the General Indemnity Agreement & Who Has to Sign It?

Author, Andy Roberts, Account Executive, Surety, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

Most questions that we receive from contractors new to the industry or new to bonded work usually center around what is a General Indemnity Agreement (GIA) and why do they (ownership) and spouse(s) have to sign personally.

The Benefits and Risks of Third Party Indemnity

Author, Andy Roberts, Account Executive, Surety Division, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

For a contractor that is wanting to bid a job, or has won a job that’s requiring a bond that they are not able to qualify for on their own, one option for increasing their bond capacity and ability to qualify would be to have a third party also indemnify to their Surety.  While there are definite risks, this type of agreement can be very beneficial to both parties.   

How Accurate Work-in-Progress Schedules Can Positively Affect Your Bond Program

Author, Matt Gaynor, Director of Surety, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

When meeting with new contractors looking to qualify for increased bonding capacity, one of the first items generally discussed is the work-in-progress Schedule (WIP). Understandably, the balance sheet and profit & loss statement get the most attention when compiling financial information for the bond company, but the WIP, whether on a quarterly or six month basis, allows the bond company to gauge how well the contractor has estimated their projects and how conservative they have been on a project’s profitability. Preparation of an accurate work in progress schedule is the only way to gauge the true profitability of the company.

How a Bank Line of Credit Can Affect Your Surety Bonding

Author, Andy Roberts, Account Executive, Surety, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

When a surety carrier is evaluating a bonding program for a contractor, they use many different underwriting factors to determine an acceptable amount of bond capacity. They will consider a contractor’s working capital, net worth and work in progress schedules, to name a few. Another important factor that can help increase a contractor's bonding capacity is a bank line of credit. 

Small Performance Bonds No Longer Require CPA Financial Statements

Author, Matt Gaynor, Director of Surety, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

In the past, many Surety Bond carriers required financial statements from a Certified Public Account (CPA), bank lines of credit, tax returns, etc. for contractor bond programs, whether the client required one bond a year or a large bond program. This is no longer the case.

Increase Bonding Capacity Through Jobsite Pictures

Author, Matt Gaynor, Director of Surety Bonding, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it can also be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars when it comes to bonding a new construction project. Let me explain the bonding process and how a few pictures can free up a contractor's bonding capacity.