California SB 1343 Expands Sexual Harassment and Abusive Conduct Prevention Training Requirements

Words of a red background “Harassment,” “Emotional,” ”Pressure,” ”Abuse, “Behavior” etc.

Author, Alyssa Burley, Client Services Coordinator, Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc.

In September 2018, former California Governor Jerry Brown approved Senate Bill 1343 (SB 1343) which expands the requirements for Sexual Harassment and Abusive Conduct Prevention training within the workplace.

New Requirements

Prior to SB 1343, California Assembly Bill 1825, Assembly Bill 2053, and State Bill 396, required employers with 50 or more employees to provide supervisors with sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training every two years. SB 1343 drops the minimum number of employees to 5 and adds a requirement for training nonsupervisory employees.

According to SB 1343, “an employer who employs 5 or more employees, including temporary or seasonal employees, [is required] to provide at least 2 hours of sexual harassment training to all supervisory employees and at least one hour of sexual harassment training to all nonsupervisory employees by January 1, 2020, and once every 2 years thereafter, as specified.” 

The bill also requires the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH), “to develop or obtain 1-hour and 2-hour online training courses on the prevention of sexual harassment in the workplace, as specified, and to post the courses on the department’s Internet Web site.” This requirement also includes providing existing informational posters and fact sheets online.

Providing Training

SB 1343 requires California’s DFEH to provide supervisor and employee training through its website. The department “expects to have such trainings available by late 2019,” according to a document provided by the DFEH. The online trainings are expected to be free for employers.

“In the interim period, DFEH is offering a sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention toolkit, including a sample sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training. Employers may use the training in conjunction with an eligible trainer to provide sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training,” according to the DFEH.

An eligible trainer qualified to conduct this training would be:

  • Attorneys who have been members of the bar of any state for at least two years and whose practice includes employment law under the Fair Employment and Housing Act or Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964;

  • Human resource professionals or harassment prevention consultants with at least two years of practical experience in:

    • Designing or conducting training on discrimination, retaliation, and sexual harassment prevention;

    • Responding to sexual harassment or other discrimination complaints;

    • Investigating sexual harassment complaints; or

    • Advising employers or employees about discrimination, retaliation, and sexual harassment prevention.

  • Law school, college, or university instructors with a post-graduate degree or California teaching credential and either 20 hours of instruction about employment law under the FEHA or Title VII.

Note, DFEH does not issue licenses nor certificates validating a person’s qualifications to teach sexual harassment prevention training classes.

Other training options include using the Risk Management Center for online trainings. Our content creators are actively working on updating the existing California Compliant Sexual Harassment and Abusive Conduct training to ensure that it remains compliant for SB 1343 requirements.

We also can recommend Equal Parts Consulting to provide in-person supervisor and/or employee training to those in San Diego and Orange Counties. To receive a discounted rate, please let them know you are a Rancho Mesa Insurance client.

Rancho Mesa Insurance will continue to monitor training options as they become available.

Resources

California Department of Fair Employment and Housing. "Sexual Harassment and Abusive Conduct Prevenetion Training Information for Employers.”
https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/32/2018/12/SB_1343_FAQs.pdf

California Department of Fair Employment and Housing. “Sexual Harassment FAQs.”
https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/resources/frequently-asked-questions/employment-faqs/sexual-harassment-faqs/